Previous ICS Symposiums

Previous ICS Symposiums

Bloomsburg Explores Diversity, Spring 2017

BU Explores

Poverty Symposium 2015-16

The symposium will include a year long series of films, lectures, and other events, culminating in a keynote address in Spring. Details about the Film Series and the Lecture Series are below.

Spring 2016 Events

The Institute for culture and society will continue to explore different aspects of poverty and its impact on the world and our local community in the spring 2016 semester with a series of faculty lectures, documentary screenings and an keynote panel on the impact of poverty on our local community. All of these events are open to public and will be followed by question-and-answer sessions led by faculty from the University. Please get in touch with Dr. Safa Saracoglu (msaracog@bloomu.edu) or Dr. Michael Hickey (mhickey@bloomu.edu) for more information on these events.

End of poverty?

John Hintz, Environmental, Geographical, and Geological Sciences
Documentary
February 25
7:00 PM
Centennial Hall, Room 218

Slaves and Poor Whites in the Old South.

Jennifer Oast, History
Lecture
March 3
7:00 PM
Centennial Hall, Room 218

Solar Mamas (online screening from PBS)

David Fazzino, Anthropology
Documentary
March 24
7:00 PM
Centennial Hall, Room 218

Poverty at the local level: a panel with Joy E. McGinnis (Columbia County Volunteers in Medicine), President Judge Thomas James (Columbia County Courthouse) and Rich Kisner (Columbia County Housing Authority)

Heather Feldhaus, Sociology, Social Work, and Criminal Justice
Keynote Panel
March 31
7 PM
Centennial Hall, Room 218

The Price We Pay

Safa Saracoglu, History
Documentary
April 7
7:00 PM
Centennial Hall, Room 218

We Come as Friends

Mark Usry, Business Education, Information Technology Management
Documentary
April 14
7:00 PM
Centennial Hall, Room 218

A Rural Reconsideration of the Subculture of Violence Hypothesis

Bob Moschgat, Sociology, Social Work, and Criminal Justice
Lecture
April 21
7:00 PM
Centennial Hall, Room 218

The Effects of Poverty on Language and Literacy Development

Patricia Lawton, Speech Language Pathology & Audiology
Lecture
April 28
7:00 PM
Centennial Hall, Room 218

Film Series, Fall 2015

Land Rush

David Fazzino, Anthropology
Thursday, September 17 at 7:00 pm
Hartline G 38

The documentary explores issues of inequality, governance and land rights in relation to the domination of large agribusiness at the expense of small farmers in Mali.

Stealing Africa

Nakul Kumar, Economics
Thursday, September 24 at 7:00 pm
Hartline G 38

The documentary focuses on corporate ownership of copper mines in Zambia, where tax avoidance and tax havens keeps the poor in an underprivileged state while benefiting the wealthy.

Just Eat It

Safa Saracoglu, History
Thursday, October 8 at 7:00 pm
Carver Hall

Did you know that we throw nearly 50% of our food in the trash? Filmmaker Grant Baldwin explores how this happens and what can be done about it in the documentary “Just eat it: A food waste story.” The documentary explores such things as our obsession with expiration dates on food and our desire for perfect produce and how that leads to widespread food waste.

Poor Kids

Alison Levitch, Psychology
Thursday, November 5 at 7:00 pm
Hartline G 38

The documentary, the last in a series being presented as part of ICS's focus on poverty, explores the state of poverty in the U.S. today from our children’s perspective.

Lecture Series, Fall 2015

“Poverty, Mental Illness, and Issues in Nursing Education”

Dr. Todd Hastings
Oct. 1 at 7 p.m.
Hartline Science Center, Room G 38
Free and open to the public

Dr. Hastings’ lecture focuses on the challenge faced by public health experts, particularly nurses, concerning what they see is a very strong connection between poverty and mental illness. Dr. Hasting’s presentation will examine these issues, and present the findings of his own research on the attitudes of nursing students towards the mentally ill. His finding can help nurse educators modify psychiatric nursing courses to foster improvement in student feelings about the mental health specialty.

“Visualizing Poverty: The Photographic Document”

Professor Vera Viditz-Ward
Oct. 29 at 7 p.m.
Hartline Science Center, Room G 38
Free and open to the public

Since the invention of photography in the mid-19th century, many photographs have addressed impoverished people and their environments. Initially these photographs were intended as moral lessons for viewers, but, as public opinion about the causes and effects of poverty have changed, so has the purpose and impact of these photographic documents. This lecture will introduce and explore the work of specific photographers and the motives behind their commitment to documenting poverty from 1840 to the present day.

“When the Fish are Gone: Climate Change Refugees, Terrorists Real and Imagined, and Climate Change Denialism”

Dr. Wendy Lee
Nov. 12 at 7 p.m.
Hartline Science Center, Room G 38
Free and open to the public

In this lecture, Dr. Lee will demonstrate that Mexico (and Mexican persons) offers a textbook case of why the fossil fuel industry does not want environmental refugees to be given a human face that might make climate change real to the public. Politicians in the US, influenced by oil and gas interests, seek political mileage by depicting undocumented workers as drug-runners, terrorists—or even just non-citizens looking to take away American jobs. A closer look, though, reveals other motives at work that have very little to do with drug-trafficking, terrorism, or jobs and everything to do with insuring the continuing power of fossil fuel corporations over developing world countries and policies. Increased public awareness that environmental crises like climate change play a role in immigration could gradually transform racist narratives about drug-runners and terrorists into more humanized accounts of victim-refugees.

Bloomsburg Explores BU Unplugged, Spring 2015

Book Circle

Groups of faculty and students will read It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens by Danah Boyd Dates: February 12, 19, 26 from 3:30-4:40 Locations: TALE Center (Christina Francis, facilitator), Andruss Library Conference Room 305, Third Floor (Pete Doerschler, facilitator)

Keynote Address

Social Media or Social Minefield: A Survival Guide for the University, the Workplace, and Life with Dr. Nancy Rothbard, Professor of Management, University of Pennsylvania Tuesday, February 17, at 7pm 1303 McCormick

Unplugged Lecture

Roundtable debate

Date: Monday, February 16, from 3:30 to 5:00. Participants: David Magolis, David Heineman, Megumi Omori, Regina Bobak Location: Hide-A-Way

Movie

"Disconnect" Monday, February 23, at 7pm McCormick 1303
Unplugged Movie

 

Bloomsburg Explores Digital Humanities, Spring 2014

A series of discussions of digital tools and projects relevant to faculty and student creative work and scholarship, and of the future of digital liberal arts. Digital Tools and Projects in the Arts and Humanities Faculty Panel Discussion Monday, April 14 at 3-5pm Centennial 239 Featuring: Sue O’Donnell (Art and Art History) Alla Myzelev (Art and Art History) Robert Dunkelberger (Library) Stephanie Schlitz (English) Christopher Podeschi (Sociology) Jennifer Whisner (EGGS) M. Safa Saracoglu (History) Digital Projects In and Out of the Classroom Student Panel Discussion Wednesday, April 16 at 7 PM Centennial 108 An all-student panel will discuss class-based projects, internship projects and student participation in University-related programs (e.g., the BU Writing Center, the Center for Community Research and Consulting, the University Archives, and the Magee Archives Project). Featuring Sarah Helter (English alumna), Rae Mead (English), Ralph Hinkle (MA program, Instructional Design), Michael Zielenskie (Studio Art), Avi Slone (English and Sociology), Curtis Bratton (History), Morgan Lewis (Chemistry), Christian Tlocznski (History and Psychology), Chris Mekosh (Criminal Justice), Andrew Semaan (Economics), and Matt Vetter (Computer Science and Mass Communications).

Digital Humanities

"Stop Calling it Digital Humanities, Start Calling it Digital Liberal Arts" Featured Guest Lecture from Professor William Pannapacker April 21, at 7 PM McCormick Center for Human Services Rm. 1303 William Pannapacker, Professor of English at Hope College, has been a leading figure in the digital humanities/digital liberal arts movement.   He is founding director of the Hope College Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Scholars Program in the Arts and Humanities, which has become a model for the integration of digital technology into undergraduate research in the humanities, and he is a frequent contributor to The Chronicle of Higher Education.  Professor Pannapacker will give a public talk on digital humanities/digital liberal arts and its place in the undergraduate curriculum on April 21, at 7 PM at Bloomsburg University's McCormick Center for Human Services Rm 1303.  The lecture is free and open to the entire community, as are the two symposium panel discussions. On April 21, Professor Pannapacker will be free to meet with interested BU faculty, staff, and students. Please contact the chair of the ICS Bloomsburg Explores symposium committee, Susie Nugent (snugent@bloomu.edu), or ICS director Mike Hickey (mhickey@bloomu.edu) regarding arrangements.