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Strategic Enrollment Management

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Microsoft Word - SEP Written Plan - Compiled 2 5-23



Situation Analysis


Each of the SEP’s five working groups was charged with writing a situation analysis reflective of their expertise and using supporting data. Each group was asked to develop a narrative that was data‐ informed and told the story of how Bloomsburg University is performing in each focus area. Each narrative was expected to include five years of data history, and a consideration to benchmark BU against the peer and competitor list as appropriate.

A situational analysis provides an assessment of the current and projected strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats (SWOT) that need to be addressed in the development of enrollment strategies. It should relate to the key performance indicators (KPI’s) that were identified earlier in the planning process. It should also be based on both the best quantitative data that is available and the qualitative information and views of experienced environmental observers. It is expected to tell an interesting story, quantify threats and opportunities, create a link between identity, actions and outcomes, and motivate specific actions with specific desired results.

The working groups began by conducting a SWOT analysis for their respective areas. They were asked to conduct the analysis through the SWOT elements defined accordingly:


  • Strengths: existing internal characteristics – physical, human, and financial – that clearly contribute to institutional success and the achievement of enrollmentgoals.

  • Weaknesses: existing internal characteristics that detract from institutional success and the achievement of enrollment goals.

  • Opportunities: external factors that have the potential to be capitalized on by theuniversity.

  • Threats: external conditions that are obstacles to institutional success and achievement of enrollment goals.


    After conducting the SWOT analysis in each group, each team conducted a written situation analysis narrative that incorporated the ideas generated during the SWOT analysis, and that used data‐ informed research in making observations and recommendations.

    The information and data revealed in the situation analyses assisted in the identification of key strategy ideas for the overall SEP process. The strategies were later discussed by the steering committee as they worked to identify priority strategies for action planning, as the plan was further developed.

    Common themes that emerged as opportunities by the working groups:

  • Review of out‐of‐state pricing in an effort to attract more non‐residentstudents

  • Demographics: untapped populations, including nontraditional students, adult learners, including non‐traditional teaching methods

  • Larger footprint in internal marketing, social media, email, texting

  • More involvement of alumni in the recruitment process

  • Greater opportunities to expand and communicate to ACE (Advanced College Experience) and STEM students

  • Fully integrating the Student Success Collaborative (SSC) to support studentretention

  • Providing additional undergraduate research opportunities

  • Growth of the Bachelor of Applied Science in Technical Leadership (BAS‐TL) program

  • Investigation to expand off‐site programs and partnerships

  • Increase certificate programs

    As the situation analyses were developed and expanded, and key institutional strategy ideas were identified, many of these original opportunities noted by the working groups became part of the initial strategies implemented for action planning. Many of these ideas later became part of the plan implementation for enrollment opportunities.

    All working groups were tasked with creating a written situation analysis for their focus areas, with the common request to incorporate institutional data into the analysis for future enrollment opportunities. The following summaries were provided to each of the working groups as potential sources of focus for each group. Groups were asked to focus their overall issues on opportunities to maintain or, in many cases, to grow new student enrollment.

    Marketing and Recruitment


    Charge – develop data‐informed strategies that address marketing and recruitment activities to support the SEP KPI’s.

    Possible Focus Areas:


  • Marketing and communication strategies

  • Branding and positioning

  • Competitive landscape

  • Peer and aspirant analysis

  • Community engagement, service, and outreach

  • Funnel management

  • Cohort shaping and characteristics

  • Communications flow

  • Admissions standards

  • Recruitment and admissions processes and systems

  • Recruitment events andprograms

  • Faculty involvement in recruitment

  • Athletics recruitment

  • Transfer pathways

  • Articulation agreements

    Undergraduate programs


    Charge – develop data‐informed strategies that address the strategic development, expansion, and enhancement of undergraduate academic programs and delivery modalities to support the SEP KPI’s.

    Possible Focus Areas:


  • New program opportunities

  • Modality and delivery systems

  • Academic advising

  • Quality educational experiences and outcomes

  • Exemplary programs (from an enrollmentperspective)

  • Course and program bottlenecks andefficiencies

  • Course and program capacity and demand

  • Occupational trends and projections

  • Faculty‐student ratios

  • Alignment of programs and student academic readiness

    Finance and Financial Aid


    Charge – develop data‐informed strategies that address: 1) the strategic use and understanding of price, cost, and discount to support the SEP KPI’s and 2) finance methods to support academic and co‐curricular programs and marketing, recruitment, and retention strategies and tactics in support of the SEP KPI’s.

    Possible Focus Areas:


  • Pricing, tuition, fees, cost of attendance

  • Cost: scholarship and aid programs and policies, discounting, tuition waivers, institutional loan programs

  • Auxiliary revenue related to enrollment

  • Price sensitivity

  • Discount sensitivity

  • Financial literacy

  • Program costs and services

  • Process efficiencies related to enrollment

    Student Success


    Charge – develop data‐informed strategies that address student success, retention, and graduation in support of the SEP KPI’s.

    Possible Focus Areas:


  • First year experience (FYE) programs

  • Sophomore support programs

  • Academic advising

  • Success coaching

  • Academic policies and processes

  • Early alert programs and processes

  • At‐risk interventions

  • Mentoring programs

  • Student satisfaction and engagement

  • Leadership and involvement opportunities

  • Volunteer, shadowship, and internship opportunities

  • Athletics and student success

  • Learning communities

    Graduate programs


    Charge – develop data‐informed strategies that address: 1) the development, expansion, and enhancement of academic and co‐curricular programs and delivery modalities for graduate students to support the SEP KPI’s; 2) marketing and recruitment for graduate students in support of the SEP KPI’s; and 3) student success programs for graduate students in support of SEP KPI’s.

    Possible Focus Areas:


  • New program opportunities

  • Modality and delivery systems

  • Graduate marketing, outreach, and recruitment

  • Communication flow

  • Branding and positioning

  • Funnel management

  • Partnerships with business andindustry

  • Student support programs

  • Quality educational experiences and outcomes

  • Exemplary programs (from an enrollmentperspective)

  • Course and program capacity and demand

  • Occupational trends and projections

More than 160 members of the campus community are engaged in developing a strategic enrollment management approach best for Bloomsburg University. Thank you for your continued support and participation.