Faculty Scholarship and Research

Faculty Scholarship and Research


Stephen Clickard

Stephen Clickard

Stephen Clickard, professor of music, chair of the Department of Music, Theatre and Dance and director of the Center for Visual and Performing Arts, had his jazz settings of six traditional Christmas carols published by eJazzLines Publications. "Noël Nouvelet," "Here We Come A-Wassailing," "Oh Come, Oh Come Emmanue," "Angels We Have Heard On High,” "God Rest Ye, Merry Gentlemen,” “It Came Upon The Midnight Clear” and The Holly and the Ivy" are also featured prominently on the soon to be released recording by the Clickard Consortium on its album, “Noël Nouvelet.”

eJazzLines provides the largest and the best selection of jazz arrangements available anywhere. From combo charts to jazz studio orchestra arrangements, vocals and instrumentals, difficulty levels of easy to the most professional, classics from the dixieland and swing eras to jazz arrangements of today's pop hits, and countless great originals.

Chris Podeschi

Chris Podeschi

Chris Podeschi, associate professor of sociology, is the primary author of the research paper “Unconventional Boomtowns: On the Social and Individual Impacts of Natural Gas Extraction from the Marcellus Shale” recently accepted for publication in Coordinating Research on the Social Impacts of Energy Development: Synthesis across the Social Sciences as a refereed book chapter. The paper is based on research done with a grant provided by Geisinger Health System. Co-authors include Heather Feldhaus, professor of sociology; John Hintz, professor of environmental issues and politics, Ethan Minier '14, as well as Dr. Lisa Bailey-Davis and Jacob Mowery, both of Geisinger.

Michael Borland

Michael Borland

Michael Borland, associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry, was among a select few to receive a SOT Faculty Grant to boost undergraduate toxicology research. Borland will use the funds to support the junior-year research project of Taylor Runkle, who has career aspirations related to biomedical science, as part of a collaborator two-semester Honors Research Project with Ellen Kehres, assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry. Specifically, the funds will aid in the purchase of cell culture supplies, ligands, and luminescent assays to reactive oxygen species.

Runkle will be conducting cell proliferation and clonal expansion studies, gene expression analyses, and examine receptor- and ligand-dependent changes in response to ultraviolet radiation as a source of reactive oxygen species. This is a component of the study of a previously characterized isosteric selenium derivative of the PPRβ/δ agonist GW501516 and its effects on cell growth, transcriptional regulation, and oxidative stress in human malignant melanoma.

Julie Vandivere

Julie Vandivere

Julie Vandivere, Ph.D., professor of English and director of the Honors Program, had her essay, "Defining Life in Essays and Reports: Mr. Bennett and Mrs. Brown” and the "Government Reports on Infant Human Mortality" selected for publication in the Selected Papers of the 26th Annual Conference on Virginia Woolf (University of Liverpool Press, 2018).

​​This year's international conference investigated how Virginia Woolf engaged with heritage, and how she understood and represented it. One strand took a look at her experience of the heritage industry, for example: libraries, museums, art galleries, authors' houses, artists' houses, stately homes, London's heritage sites, and tourist sites in Britain and abroad. Alternatively, the topic encompasses Woolf's constructions of heritage, including literary heritage, intellectual heritage, family histories, the history of women and the history of lesbians. The conference also considered ways in which Woolf has been represented and even appropriated by the heritage industry, for example in virtual and physical exhibitions; libraries, archives and collections; plaques, memorials, and statues; and at National Trust or other properties such as Monk's House and Knole.

Michael Patte

Michael Patte

Michael Patte, Ph.D., professor of teaching and learning and a child life specialist, along with his colleagues Jaipaul L. Roopnarine, James E. Johnson, and Suzanne F. Quinn recently had their chapter International Perspectives on Early Childhood Education published in The Handbook of International Perspectives on Early Childhood Education published by Routledge 2018.

Patte, also offered two presentations, "The value of open-ended materials in promoting play across community and educational settings in Trinidad and Tobago" and "The creation of a minor course of study in playwork – One university’s story," at the 44th Annual Conference of The Association for the Study of Play in Melbourne, Beach, Fla.

Andrew Blair Staley

Blair Staley

Andrew Blair Staley, CPA, MST, professor of accounting, passed a six-part exam to become an AccessData Certified Examiner. The training leading to certification educates forensic professionals in new technology used in fraud investigations. Staley has taught in the Department of Accounting's pioneering fraud investigation program since its inception in 2003.

For individuals who are proficient with Forensic Toolkit technology and are familiar with Forensics Toolkit (FTK), Password Recovery Toolkit (PRTK), FTK Imager, and Registry Viewer. ACE candidates will benefit from having the AccessData BootCamp and Windows Forensics - XP courses as a foundation. The ACE certification consists of an online exam with both knowledge-based and practical-based components.

Matthew Polinski

Matthew Polinski

Matthew Polinski, Ph.D., assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry, recently had his research published in Inorganic Chemistry. The communication, “[Ag2M(Te2O5)2]SO4 (M = CeIV or ThIV): A New Purely Inorganic d/f-Heterometallic Cationic Material” included recent chemistry graduate Todd Poe as first author. This work was a collaboration with scientists from Florida State and Creighton University.

Inorganic Chemistry publishes fundamental studies in all phases of inorganic chemistry. Coverage includes experimental and theoretical reports on quantitative studies of structure and thermodynamics, kinetics, mechanisms of inorganic reactions, bioinorganic chemistry, and relevant aspects of organometallic chemistry, solid-state phenomena, and chemical bonding theory. Emphasis is placed on the synthesis, structure, thermodynamics, reactivity, spectroscopy, and bonding properties of significant new and known compounds.

Michael Shepard

Michael Shepard, Ph.D., professor and chair, environmental, geographical, and geological sciences, recently had a new paper, "A Revised Shape Model of Asteroid (216) Kleopatra," accepted for publication in Icarus, the International Journal of Solar System Studies. A figure from this paper will be the cover for the upcoming September issue. Kleopatra is a large M-class, or metallic asteroid, and unusual because it is shaped like a dumbbell. It is also a potential spacecraft target in the next decade.

Highlights from the paper include: a revised shape model for Asteroid (216) Kleopatra is presented, Kleopatra is bi-lobate and one of the most elongated asteroids observed, based on radar properties, Kleopatra appears to be dominantly metallic, radar data suggest variations in the extent of silicate regolith and geopotential modeling indicates regolith will accumulate at the asteroid neck.

Lam Nguyen

Lam Nguyen

Lam Nguyen, Ph.D., professor of management and international business, and Mariam Sarkessian, a former BU Honors Program student and a management major, have their coauthored paper entitled “Student’s Perception on Business Ethics: An Investigation of French Students based on Gender, Age, and Education.” accepted for publication in the May 2018 Issue of SAM Advanced Management Journal. This research was completed as part of the student’s study abroad experience in France and has received recognition at the National Collegiate Honors Council Conference.

SAM Advanced Management Journal, a peer-reviewed journal published by the Society for Advancement of Management, promotes scientific study of the principles governing organized efforts in industrial and economic life. SAM Advanced Management Journal is one of the leading journals in management.

Kristie Byrum

Kristie Byrum

Kristie Byrum, Ph.D, APR, an assistant professor of public relations, recently returned from the World Public Relations Forum in Oslo, Norway, where she presented, “A New Taxonomy for Strategic Communication Integration: A Model for Incorporating Public Relations Curriculum into Graduate Degree Programs."

This presentation represents the second time that Byrum has been appointed to present work during the research stream at the biennial World Public Relations Forum. In 2016, she presented scholarship on public relations ethics at the global conference in Toronto, resulting in published paper in Public Relations Review.

Mindy Suzanne Andino

Mindy Suzanne Andino

Mindy Suzanne Andino, Ed.D., assistant professor of teaching and learning, along with Kristin Austin, Frederick Douglass Teaching Scholar, and Tiffany Long, BU ’18, presented “Putting the SUPER in Supervisor: How to Supervise Graduate Assistants” at the National ACPA: College Student Educators International Conference in Houston, Texas in March. Melissa Benfer BU ’19 and Tiffany Long BU’ 18 were selected as recipients of an ACPA grant.

Kristin Austin, Frederick Douglass Teaching Scholar Fellow, along with Dr. Mindy Andino, in the Department of Teaching and Learning, presented her dissertation research titled “Parents as Partners, not Pesters: Understanding Parental Role in New Student Success” at the National ACPA: College Student Educators International Conference in Houston, Texas in early March.

Mary Nicholson

Mary Nicholson

Mary Nicholson, Ph.D., professor of instructional technology, and Mindi Miller, Ph.D., RN, professor of nursing, completed an intensive three-week course from Quality Matters (QM) titled “Applying the QM Rubric Face-to-Face Facilitator Certification (AFFC).” They are now certified to offer the QM course “Applying the QM Rubric (APPQMR)” on campus. Currently, 91 BU faculty have finished the online APPQMR workshop that provides quality assurance guidelines for improving distance education course organization and design.

Currently, 91 BU faculty have finished the online APPQMR workshop that provides quality assurance guidelines for improving distance education course organization and design. Faculty members at BU who would like to complete the APPQMR course will now have the option of either taking the course online or at our Bloomsburg campus. The goal of QM, a non-profit quality assurance organization, is to provide a mechanism for reviewing and improving online learning structures.

Mindi Miller

Mindi Miller

Mindi Miller, Ph.D., RN, professor of nursing, and Mary Nicholson, Ph.D., professor of instructional technology, completed an intensive three-week course from Quality Matters (QM) titled “Applying the QM Rubric Face-to-Face Facilitator Certification (AFFC).” They are now certified to offer the QM course “Applying the QM Rubric (APPQMR)” at our Bloomsburg campus.

Currently, 91 BU faculty have finished the online APPQMR workshop that provides quality assurance guidelines for improving distance education course organization and design. Faculty members at BU who would like to complete the APPQMR course will now have the option of either taking the course online or at our Bloomsburg campus. The goal of QM, a non-profit quality assurance organization, is to provide a mechanism for reviewing and improving online learning structures.

Brian C. Johnson

Brian C. Johnson

Brian C. Johnson, Ph.D., instructor of academic enrichment, Act 101 advisor, has been accepted to the 2018 Summer School in Cinema Human Rights and Advocacy in Venice, Italy. The 13th edition of the Summer School in Cinema Human Rights and Advocacy is a training initiative jointly developed by EIUC and CHRA. The 10-day intense training is aimed at young professionals wishing to broaden their understanding on the connections between human rights, films, digital media and video advocacy, to share ideas and foster participatory and critical thinking on urgent human rights issues, debate with experts and filmmakers from all over the world during the 75th Venice international Film Festival and learn how to use films as a tool for social and cultural change.

As part of the program participants are required to watch and analyze a selection of human rights related screenings at the 75th Venice International Film Festival. Whenever possible, filmmakers, jury members and critics from the cinema world are invited to participate to discussions with the summer school participants. Participants will be given a 7-day Cinema accreditation to the Film Festival giving access to a selection of festival screenings.

Anne Dyer Stuart

Anne Dyer Stuart

Anne Dyer Stuart MFA, Ph.D., assistant professor of English, recently published poems in the national literary journals, Louisiana Literature, Raleigh Review, and The Texas Review. She was also invited to write about teaching young adult literature to future teachers on The Worrisome Words blog. The Worrisome Words, produced by Jen Harrison of East Stroudsburg University, publishes pieces on all areas of children’s literature and YA literature scholarship. Finally, she was invited to transition from the Impost editorial board to Reviews Editor. Impost: A Journal of Creative and Critical Work is a peer-reviewed journal published by the English Association of Pennsylvania State Universities.

Joseph L. Andreacci

Joseph L. Andreacci

Joseph L. Andreacci, and Jennifer Venditti, associate professor of Biological and Allied Health Sciences, along with former students Emily Cumberledge, MS ’17 and Cassandra Myers, MS ’15 are authors on the manuscript entitled, “The Effect of the Menstrual Cycle on Body Composition Determined by Contact-Electrode Bioelectrical Impedance Analyzers,” which appears in the March 2018 issue of the International Journal of Exercise Science.

The primary aim of the International Journal of Exercise Science is to engage undergraduate and graduate students in scholarly activity as authors and reviewers as they develop into professionals. In accordance with this aim, on manuscript submissions it is mandatory that at least one author be a student that has played a prominent role in the overall study.

Denise Davidson

Denise L. Davidson

Denise L. Davidson, Ph.D., assistant professor of teaching and learning, recently co-presented an ACUHO-I research grant-funded study webinar, "A Comparison Study of Resident Students' Sense of Community." This webinar shared findings from research that included students’ sense of community in a comparative analysis of campus residence halls to public private partnership (P3) developed and managed student housing. Data was collected from upperclass students through both quantitative and qualitative methodologies and included multiple site selection with representation from both the east and west coast of the U.S.

According to ACUHO-I , the webinar was an ideal session for professionals faced with critical decision making for residential facility renovations or new construction needs that wish to further explore partnership opportunities with a public private developer. Further, it would provide insight for newer professionals, that are unaware of the private public development paradigm.

Michael Ruffini

Michael Ruffini

Michael Ruffini, Ed.D., professor of educational technology, presented a poster/presentation "Creating POWTOON’s for Your Classroom” at The Pennsylvania Educational Technology Expo and Conference (PETE&C), a statewide event that provides quality programs focused on technology hardware, software and integration strategies in education. The conference was held from Feb. 11 to Feb. 14 at the Hershey Lodge and Convention Center.

The Pennsylvania Educational Technology Expo and Conference (PETE&C) is a statewide event that provides quality programs focused on technology in the educational field. Each year, hundreds of exhibitors showcase their latest technology products and services to the vast audience of teachers, administrators, technology directors, school board members and more.

Dina Clark

Dina Clark

Dina Clark, Ph.D., assistant professor of accounting, has an article accepted for publication in the International Journal of Public Administration entitled “Russian Public Sector Employees’ Reasoning of Ethical Behavior: An Empirical Study.” IJPA is an international, research-driven, and peer-reviewed publication aimed at exploring the latest developments in public administration, public policy, and management — translating theory for practice and practice into theory.

Its aim is to be truly global in scope, covering developed, emerging and transitional states and all areas of public activity. IJPA welcomes both individual country-based and especially comparative work. Its target audience is not just scholars but also policy-makers and practitioners, including aspiring public sector leaders engaged in education and research in the growing global MPA community.

Sue O'Donnell

Sue O'Donnell

Sue O'Donnell, MFA, associate professor of art and art history, presented at the annual SECAC Conference in October 2017, hosted at the Columbus College of Art & Design. This year's conference, entitled Microscopes & Megaphones, brought together educators, scholars, administrators, and independent artists from around the country to exchange ideas and concerns relevant to the practice and study of art. Her paper "Finding Your Narrative (and Making it Stick)" was selected for the panel "Tell Me a Story: Tapping the Power of Narrative in Graphic Design". Her research referenced a NY Times bestselling book called "Made to Stick" written by Chip and Dan Heath.

Jennifer Haney

Jennifer Haney

Jennifer Haney, Ph.D., assistant professor in EGGS, had an article published in the Journal of Geography entitled “A Geographic Approach for Teaching about Terrorism” (Volume 116, Issue 6, 2017). The article was based on Haney’s experiences in teaching a new course she developed, Geography of Terrorism.

As part of the course, students travelled to the 9/11 museum in New York City. Their experience there was captured by a photograph that became the cover for that issue of the journal. The photograph was taken by Cheryl Smith, secretary of the EGGS department, who was one of the trip chaperones.

Melissa Cheese

Melissa Cheese

Melissa Cheese, Ed.D., assistant professor of reading, and James Vines, Ph.D., faculty advisor, co-authored a paper entitled “The Importance of Support Networks for At-Promise Students.” The paper was accepted for publication in the November 2017 issue of the Journal of Research Initiatives. The Journal of Research Initiatives (JRI) is a peer-reviewed and methodologically diverse open access journal, publishing articles on higher education research and best practices. The journal covers a broad range of educational issues including social justice, economic equality, academic achievement, intellectual best practices, and cultural empathy.

At-promise students enter colleges and universities with various challenges including being academically underprepared and lacking essential critical thinking skills to be successful. The article explores the role of an educational opportunity program and its efforts to support student success.

James Vines

James Vines

James Vines, Ph.D. faculty advisor, and Melissa Cheese, Ed.D., assistant professor of reading, co-authored a paper entitled “The Importance of Support Networks for At-Promise Students.” The paper was accepted for publication in the November 2017 issue of the Journal of Research Initiatives. The Journal of Research Initiatives (JRI) is a peer-reviewed and methodologically diverse open access journal, publishing articles on higher education research and best practices. The journal covers a broad range of educational issues including social justice, economic equality, academic achievement, intellectual best practices, and cultural empathy.

At-promise students enter colleges and universities with various challenges including being academically underprepared and lacking essential critical thinking skills to be successful. The article explores the role of an educational opportunity program and its efforts to support student success.

Carolyn LaMacchia

Carolyn LaMacchia

Carolyn LaMacchia, assistant professor of information and technology management, and Loren F. Selznick, assistant professor of business law, authored the interdisciplinary article "Cybersecurity Liability: How Technically Savvy Can We Expect Small Business Owners To Be?". The article has been accepted for publication in the Spring 2018 issue of the Journal of Business & Technology Law, published by the University of Maryland. This research addresses the growing potential liability to small businesses for data security breaches and suggests legal protections for small business who have neither the financial resources nor the technical expertise to battle cybercriminals.

Loren Selznick

Loren Selznick

Loren F. Selznick, assistant professor of business law, and Carolyn LaMacchia, assistant professor of information and technology management, authored the interdisciplinary article "Cybersecurity Liability: How Technically Savvy Can We Expect Small Business Owners To Be?". The article has been accepted for publication in the Spring 2018 issue of the Journal of Business & Technology Law, published by the University of Maryland. This research addresses the growing potential liability to small businesses for data security breaches and suggests legal protections for small business who have neither the financial resources nor the technical expertise to battle cybercriminals.

Ellen Kehres

Ellen Kehres

Ellen Kehres, associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry, along with Michael Borland, assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry published a collaborative research article in the October 2017 issue of Toxicological Sciences. The paper, “PPARβ/δ and PPARγ Inhibit Melanoma Tumorigenicity by Modulating Inflammation and Apoptosis” included four Bloomsburg University undergraduate student co-authors and was also chosen as an Editor’s Highlight for that issue.

Jesús Salas-Elorza

Jesús Salas-Elorza

Jesús Salas-Elorza, professor of Spanish of the Department of Languages and Cultures. Translation of the collection of poems title Mall by the Venezuelan poet Julieta León in collaboration with River Poets of the town of Bloomsburg was published in its second translated edition, April 2017, by Adoro Leer at Create Space. Born in 1949 in Caracas, Venezuela. Graduate in Philosophy and in Letters, by the Central University of Venezuela. León studied music and piano, for many years, in the academy Juan Manuel Olivares; made sculpture and worked ceramics in the Fire Arts Workshop. Specialist in Group Dynamics, graduated from the postgraduate Humanities of the School of Psychology of the Central University of Venezuela.

Ferda Asya

Ferda Asya

Ferda Asya, Ph.D., professor of English, presented a paper, titled “From Wharton to White: Paris in Focus and Flux in Expatriate Writing,” at the American Literature Association (ALA) Annual Conference in Boston, Massachusetts, on 28 May 2017. The American Literature Association is committed to exploring the richness and diversity of American writing and welcomes all forms of scholarship. It is not limited to any specific critical methodology or dogma.

The primary purpose of the American Literature Association is the advancement of humanistic learning by encouraging the study of American authors and their works. The American Literature Association shall actively encourage fellowship and scholarly interaction among persons interested in American authors, their art, their ideas, and their times.

Debbie Stayer

Debbie Stayer

Debbie Stayer, Ph.D., RN-BC, CCRN-K, assistant professor of nursing, and Joan S. Lockhart Ph.D., RN, CORLN, AOCN, CNE, ANEF, FAAN, Professor Duquesne University, authors of Living with Dying in the Pediatric ICU:A Nursing Perspective published in the American Journal of Critcal Care (July 2016) were awarded the 2017 APEX Grand Award for Writing, top-level recognition reserved for the most outstanding entries. APEX Awards for Publication Excellence, is an annual competition for publishers, editors, writers and designers who create print, Web, electronic and social media materials. This year, only 100 of more than 1,400 entries received APEX Grand Awards.

Their research provides insight into the complex issues of caring for dying children and the children’s families from the perspective of nurses in pediatric intensive care units. APEX judges noted that the article offers “a thoughtful, thorough and well-written discussion of the challenges faced by pediatric nurses who care for children with life-threatening illnesses” and called it “an impressive analysis with a lot of useful advice for practitioners.”

Conrad Quintyn

Conrad Quintyn

Conrad Quintyn, Ph.D., associate professor of anthropology has published two articles. The first is a coauthored article titled: An assessment of postcranial indices, ratios, and body mass versus eco-geographical variables of prehistoric Jomon, Yayoi agriculturalists, and Kumejima Islanders of Japan. American Journal Human Biology 2017;00:e23015. This research, partially supported by the College of Liberal Arts Research and Disciplinary Grants, has implications for understanding patterns of long bone variation in prehistoric East Asians and Native North and South Americans. The second article is titled: Religion and Science: The reality of compatibility and illusion of conflict. Sociology and Anthropology 2016, 4(4): 249-256.

Christina Francis

Christina Francis

Christina Francis, Ph.D., associate professor of English, presented a paper entitled, “If You Weren’t Such a Clotpole … : A Look at Merthur (BBC's Merlin) Fanfiction” at the International Arthurian Congress, July 23-29, in Wurzburg, Germany. The International Arthurian Congress occurs every three years in a different location, bringing together scholars from all corners of the globe who study and teach Arthurian literature. Her paper examined the value of Arthurian fan fiction as Arthurian texts in their own right and the role of fan fiction in Arthurian medievalism.

Matthew Ricker

Matthew Ricker, Ph.D., assistant professor of environmental, geographical and geological sciences, has been awarded a $25,300 grant from the National Geographic Society for his project “Living with water: Classic Maya pond management at El Peru-Waka’, Peten, Guatemala.” Damien Marken, instructor of anthropology, is a co-investigator. The National Geographic Society is one of the largest non-profit scientific and educational institutions in the world. Founded in 1888, its interests include geography, archaeology and natural science, the promotion of environmental and historical conservation, and the study of world culture and history.

Amarilis Hidalgo de Jesus

Amarilis Hidalgo de Jesus

Amarilis Hidalgo de Jesus, Ph.D., professor of language and cultures, published the Review Essay "Escritoras bolivianas a traves de su historia literaria" (Bolivian Women Writers' literary history)" in Letras Femeninas, 42.2, pp. 145-151. Lf (Letras femeninas), the journal of the International Association of Women’s Studies in Hispanic Literature and Culture (AILCFH), was one of the earliest academic journals to be devoted strictly to gender related issues, women authors and feminist theory in the context of Hispanic literatures and cultures (with some articles on Luso-Brazilian and US-Latino authors and filmmakers).

The biannual, peer-reviewed journal was first published in Spring 1975 at the University of Colorado, Denver by a progressive group of largely Latin and North American women scholars and writers working in US universities and colleges, and has been published without interruption since then. In additional to critical articles on gender or gender-related topics, Lf features unpublished work by Spanish, Latin American and Latina women authors, poets and playwrights, interviews with writers and critics, and a substantial book review section in every issue.

David Magolis

David Magolis

David Magolis, Ph.D., associate professor of mass communications, was recently selected as the Outstanding Volunteer for the National Association of Media Literacy Education. This award is given every two years.

The Outstanding Volunteer Award, "is specifically in recognition of a non-Board member volunteering a substantial amount of time in service of a specific NAMLE project or initiative. This award is given to a volunteer who has devoted many hours to their volunteer task(s) over a period of three or more months." Magolis presented and moderated two sessions at the conference on June 26-28 in Chicago.

Swapan Mookerjee

Swapan Mookerjee

Swapan Mookerjee, Ph.D., professor of exercise science, is a co-author of a research paper published in Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology (June 2017). This work is based on his collaborative work with colleagues at the Institute of Physiology & Anatomy, as well the Institute of Movement & Neuroscience, German Sport University, Cologne, Germany. According to Mookerjee, these investigations will enhance our understanding of the physiological modeling of cardiorespiratory responses following high intensity resistance exercise.

Rebecca Toothaker

Rebecca Toothaker

Rebecca Toothaker, Ph.D., R.N., assistant professor of nursing, was able to present her research “The Impact of Clickers on Nursing Education: Millennial’s Perspective ” at the Elsevier Nursing Conference, Las Vegas, Nevada in March 2017. This poster presentation disseminated research findings from her grant to explore the millennial’s perception of clicker technology as an active strategy in a nursing classroom.

In addition, she published a manuscript stemming from her dissertation in the Journal of Professional Nursing entitled “A Phenomenological Study of Millennial Students and Traditional Pedagogies.” She was also able to present at the Pennsylvania Association of School Nurses and Practitioners (PASNAP) annual education conference in March 2017. The title of the conference was: “Light the Way: Brighten a Student’s Tomorrow” The title of her accepted paper was “Clinical skills in the School Setting: You want me to do what?” The three hour podium presentation aimed to enhance the school nurses’ understanding of skills, adapt current techniques for nursing procedures, and provided a working knowledge of evidenced based practices for the school nurse.

Melissa Cheese

Melissa Cheese, Ed.D., assistant professor of reading, at the 41st Annual National Association for Developmental Education's Conference was appointed as co-chair of the NADE Reading Special Interest Network. The Reading SPIN is a community of learners, researchers, and practitioners who share ideas about teaching developmental reading at the college level as well as research and practice related to content area reading for the purpose of promoting reading comprehension in all disciplines.

In addition, Cheese recently published the article: “Integrating Writing into a Developmental Reading Course to Motivate Reluctant Readers" in the NADE Reading SPIN Newsletter (February 2017).

Chigozie Achebe

Chigozie Achebe, Ph.D., director of access and success, assistant professor of academic enrichment, had her book chapter proposal, “Student Leadership and Activism Initiative (SLAI),” recently accepted for inclusion in the upcoming book, "Social Justice and Parent Partnerships in Multicultural Education Contexts: Making Schools Work." This edited text book volume, published by IGI Global (formerly Idea Group Inc.), will expose teachers, administrators, and university faculty to pedagogies, strategies, and practical hands-on methods that may be used to develop stronger parent partnerships using social justice. This book is anticipated to be released in 2017.

Caryn Terwilliger

Caryn Terwilliger, Ph.D., assistant professor of teaching and learning, had her research with Rogowsky, B., Young, C. and Kribbs, E, "Playful learning with technology: The effect of computer-assisted instruction on literacy and numeracy skills of preschoolers" accepted for publication in The International Journal of Play. The journal’s annual acceptance rate for submitted manuscripts is 20 percent.

Also, Terwilliger had her presentation, "Computer-assisted instruction: Increasing young learners’ literacy and mathematical gains" accepted for the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education, Austin, TX. This proposal received the highest reviewer scores and I was also invited to submit it my presentation/research to one of their international journals. Additionally, she was recently awarded the McDowell Institute Faculty Fellowship for 2017. Title of Fellowship for Professional Development: Developing Culturally Responsive Pedagogy: Enhancing Student Instruction and Learning.

Kurt Smith

Kurt Smith

Kurt Smith, Ph.D., professor of philosophy, recently returned from having given the keynote for the Third Annual Southern Utah University Undergraduate Philosophy Conference, at Southern Utah University, Cedar City, Utah. The conference has emerged as a premier showcase of undergraduate talent and research, funded in part by the Grace A. Tanner Center for Human Values.

The Grace A. Tanner Center for Human Values was created through an endowment provided by the Tanner Trust for Utah Universities by Obert C. Tanner, Professor Emeritus of philosophy at the University of Utah and the Founder and former Chairman of the O.C. Tanner Jewelry Company.

Sharlene Gilman

Sharlene Gilman

Sharlene Gilman, Ph.D., assistant professor of writing in the Department of Academic Enrichment, had an article accepted for publication in the Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy. The article, "Sacred Shock: Student Actors on Anti-bullying Improvisation and Impact of Self-rehearsal" is a study of adolescent actors from Selinsgrove High School's Tolerance Troupe. The article focuses on how actors and troupe alumni see using dramatic arts to affect peer audiences and the ways in which taking multiple positions in the theatrical and real dynamic of bully, bystander, and target author their world-view and themselves.

Cassandra Sachar

Cassandra Sachar

Cassandra O’Sullivan Sachar, Ed.D., assistant professor of writing, recently published several articles: “How to Shrink Your Course” in The Chronicle of Higher Education (September 2016), “6 Tips for Supercharging Your Learning Stations” in Edutopia (October 2016), “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: How Teacher Modeling Improves Student Writing” in Teachers.Net Gazette (October- November 2016), “Five Quick Tips to Motivate Reluctant Writers” in the NADE English SPIN Newsletter (November 2016), “Bridging Students’ Cultural Understanding: Teaching World Literature” in Modern English Teacher (January 2017), and “Reflection on My First Year as a Professor: How I Cultivated a Rewarding Experience” in Women in Higher Education (February 2017).

Kai Kuang

Kai Kuang

Kai Kuang, Ph.D., assistant professor of communication studies, recently recent the Gerald R. Miller Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation Award at the annual National Communication Association's Annual Convention. The Dissertation Awards program was created in 1970 to recognize new scholars who have recently completed their dissertation. The first awards were given in 1971. The Miller Award is presented to most outstanding dissertations completed in the field. Up to three awards may be given in any year.

Kuang also received the Top Paper Award from the Health Communication Division at the Convention this year.

Faith Warner

Faith Warner

Faith Warner, Ph.D., professor of Anthropology, has been selected to serve a three year term on the U.S. Student Fulbright National Screening Committee for study in Mexico through the Institute of International Education (IIE), by invitation of the Institute’s Board of Trustees and CEO, Allan Goodman.

Warner is a 1995 Fulbright awardee, having previously received a Fulbright Garcia-Robles award to conduct ethnographic research with Guatemalan Maya peoples in refugee camps in Mexico and she is a long-standing member of the Fulbright Organization. She also serves the IIE as an advisor for the Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship Program and she is Representative of the East of the national executive council of Lambda Alpha National Collegiate Honor Society in Anthropology.

Deb Sanders

Debra Sanders

Deb Sanders, Ph.D., RN, GCNS-BC, FNGNA, assistant professor of nursing and Susan Beck, MSN, RN, assistant professor of nursing, presented at the national ATI Nursing Education Summit, Nashville, TN. Their poster presentation, “ Therapeutic Communication Vignettes: Innovative Teaching Strategy to Engage Senior Level Nursing Students”, demonstrated teaching innovation in the Adult Health 2 senior level nursing course, in which simulated case scenarios and group process is used to enhance the students communication and interaction techniques.

The ATI (Assessment Technology Institute) Summit is attended by nurse educators across the United States to expand and excel in nursing education through the use of integrated nursing education learning systems.

Anne-Dyer Stuart

Anne-Dyer Stuart

Anne-Dyer Stuart, MFA, Ph.D., assistant professor of English, recently had a poem entitled “Inheritance” published in AGNI, a literary journal from Boston University. AGNI has nominated “Inheritance” for the national anthology, Best New Poets 2016.

Stuart also published the poems, “Quick Magic” and “Practice” in the literary journals Pembroke Magazine and Exit 7.

Jerry Wemple

Jerry Wemple

Jerry Wemple, MFA, professor of English, had two recent publications. Wemple’s poem “Bridge” appears in the current issue of “cahoodaloodaling,” a quarterly literary journal.

His essay “Funny,” about growing up in rural Pennsylvania, was recently published in “Full Grown People.” Wemple is the author of three poetry collections. His poems and essays have appeared in numerous journals and anthologies.

Lori Metzger

Lori Metzger

Lori M. Metzger, Ph.D., NP-C, assistant professor of nursing, presented at the Education and Simulation conference sponsored by Drexel University in Clearwater Florida on “Assimilating Nursing Students into the Community: Simulation in Public Health." This oral presentation demonstrated the recent teaching innovation implemented in Nursing 410 Public Health Nursing. Through four specific scenarios in correctional health, home health, occupational health and school health, students participate in this simulation to enhance their learning in health settings in a community-based and community-oriented nursing practice.

Metzger presented this with the Director of the Simulated Learning Lab for the Nursing Department Mary-Lee Helbing, MSN. Through this endeavor of teaching innovation, Metzger and Helbing have been awarded a TALE grant for introducing the technology of telehealth into these simulated scenarios.

George Agbango

George Agbango

George Agbango, Ph.D., acting vice provost and dean of undergraduate studies, served as the keynote speaker of the third bi-annual Faculty of Education International Conference at Nnamdi Azikiwe University in Awka, Nigeria. Agbango spoke on the conference's theme, "Emerging Issues in Higher Education in the 21st Century."

The international conference was sponsored by the Global Awareness Society International Unizik Chapter of Awka, Nigeria. GASI promotes research and education in matters related to globalization through annual professional and academic conferences, publication of conference proceedings, publication of the refereed Journal of Global Awareness, provide scholarship support for conference participation, and participation in service and charitable projects around the globe.

Michael C. Hickey

Michael Hickey

Michael C. Hickey, Ph.D., professor of history, has a research essay "Who Controls The Woods? Forests and Monogovlastie in Smolensk in 1917" that will appear in the peer reviewed journal Revolutionary Russia in June 2019. Revolutionary Russia is the foremost journal on the revolutionary period of Russia. It publishes interdisciplinary research and reviews.