Faculty Scholarship and Research

Faculty Scholarship and Research


David Magolis

David Magolis

David Magolis, Ph.D., associate professor of mass communications, was recently selected as the Outstanding Volunteer for the National Association of Media Literacy Education. This award is given every two years.

The Outstanding Volunteer Award, "is specifically in recognition of a non-Board member volunteering a substantial amount of time in service of a specific NAMLE project or initiative. This award is given to a volunteer who has devoted many hours to their volunteer task(s) over a period of three or more months." Magolis presented and moderated two sessions at the conference on June 26-28 in Chicago.

Mindy Suzanne Andino

Mindy Suzanne Andino

Mindy Suzanne Andino, Ed.D., assistant professor of teaching and learning, presented at the ACPA-College Student Educators International Annual Conference in Columbus, Ohio, with three graduate students in the College Student Affairs graduate program. Research presentations included, “Preparing for the Alpha Generation Entering College: Foreshadowing and Dialectic,” with Mary (Kate) Orzolek ’17 and “Drunkorexia and Disordered Eating in College Students” with Katie Marie Slater ‘17 and Olivia Naugle ’15.

Andino’s first presentation covered how student affairs practitioners have a responsibility to begin discussing how higher education will transform as students begin to enroll who have never known a world without social media. In this session, presenters explored the enrollment of Generation Alpha in an effort to implement a strengths-based education initiative. Presenters discussed the potential academic performance and social engagement of this generation.

The second presentation explored the phenomenon of Drunkorexia, typically categorized by cutting out food to save calories for alcoholic calories, excessive exercising or purposefully drinking to excess. This research explored the lived experiences of students to gain a nuanced understanding of the implication of Drunkorexic behaviors through interviews conducted by a team of graduate research students under the guidance of Andino. This research was funded by a Faculty Research Grant.

Andrew Blair Staley

Blair Staley

Andrew Blair Staley, CPA, professor of accounting, and his colleague, Donald T. Williamson, the Eminent Professor of Taxation and the Howard S. Dvorkin Faculty Fellow at American University, had an article published, Williamson, D. T. & Staley, A. B. (2017). Ransomware: Tax Compliance Issues for a New Reality. Tax Management Memorandum, 58 (12), 281-287. Tax Management Memorandum provides a authoritative outlook on new issues, developments, trends and strategies. Tax Management Memorandum has a total distribution of 4,437.

Swapan Mookerjee

Swapan Mookerjee

Swapan Mookerjee, Ph.D., professor of exercise science, is a co-author of a research paper published in Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology (June 2017). This work is based on his collaborative work with colleagues at the Institute of Physiology & Anatomy, as well the Institute of Movement & Neuroscience, German Sport University, Cologne, Germany. According to Mookerjee, these investigations will enhance our understanding of the physiological modeling of cardiorespiratory responses following high intensity resistance exercise.

Denise Davidson

Denise L. Davidson

Denise L. Davidson, Ph.D., assistant professor of teaching and learning, has been awarded the 2017 ACUHO-I Research and Publication Award. Davidson, who teaches in the College Student Affairs graduate program, will be presented the award in June during the Association of College and University Housing Officers - International’s annual conference in Providence, R.I.

ACUHO-I is the Association of College and University Housing Officers-International. ACUHO-I members believe in developing exceptional residential experiences at colleges, universities, and other post-secondary institutions around the world.

Michael Shepard

Michael Shepard, Ph.D., professor and chair, environmental, geographical, and geological sciences, had his second book, "Introduction to Planetary Photometry," published this spring by Cambridge University Press.

Introducing planetary photometry as a quantitative remote sensing tool, this handbook demonstrates how reflected light can be measured and used to investigate the physical properties of bodies in our Solar System. Shepard explains how data gathered from telescopes and spacecraft are processed and used to infer properties such as the size, shape, albedo, and composition of celestial objects including planets, moons, asteroids, and comets.

Beginning with an overview of the history and background theory of photometry, later chapters delve into the physical principles behind commonly used photometric models and the mechanics of observation, data reduction, and analysis. Real-world examples, problems, and case studies are included, all at an introductory level suitable for new graduate students, planetary scientists, amateur astronomers and researchers looking for an overview of this field.

Michael C. Hickey

Michael Hickey

Michael C. Hickey, Ph.D., professor of history, presented the research paper "Dogs in the Manger? Rural Smolensk in 1917" at the 55th Annual Meeting of the Southern Conference on Slavic Studies in Alexandria, Va., this spring.

Hickey's paper examined the intersection of village-level conflicts over control of forest resources and political debates over the locations of decision-making power and the structure of the revolutionary state in rural Russia in 1917, based upon local archival and newspaper sources. Hickey Scholarship

Rebecca Toothaker

Rebecca Toothaker

Rebecca Toothaker, Ph.D., R.N., assistant professor of nursing, was able to present her research “The Impact of Clickers on Nursing Education: Millennial’s Perspective ” at the Elsevier Nursing Conference, Las Vegas, Nevada in March 2017. This poster presentation disseminated research findings from her grant to explore the millennial’s perception of clicker technology as an active strategy in a nursing classroom.

In addition, she published a manuscript stemming from her dissertation in the Journal of Professional Nursing entitled “A Phenomenological Study of Millennial Students and Traditional Pedagogies.” She was also able to present at the Pennsylvania Association of School Nurses and Practitioners (PASNAP) annual education conference in March 2017. The title of the conference was: “Light the Way: Brighten a Student’s Tomorrow” The title of her accepted paper was “Clinical skills in the School Setting: You want me to do what?” The three hour podium presentation aimed to enhance the school nurses’ understanding of skills, adapt current techniques for nursing procedures, and provided a working knowledge of evidenced based practices for the school nurse.

Melissa Cheese

Melissa Cheese, Ed.D., assistant professor of reading, at the 41st Annual National Association for Developmental Education's Conference was appointed as co-chair of the NADE Reading Special Interest Network. The Reading SPIN is a community of learners, researchers, and practitioners who share ideas about teaching developmental reading at the college level as well as research and practice related to content area reading for the purpose of promoting reading comprehension in all disciplines.

In addition, Cheese recently published the article: “Integrating Writing into a Developmental Reading Course to Motivate Reluctant Readers" in the NADE Reading SPIN Newsletter (February 2017).

Michael Patte

Michael Patte

Michael Patte, Ph.D., professor of teaching and learning and a child life specialist, offered two keynote presentations at the Enhancing Child Development through Play Conference at the University of the West Indies in Trinidad and Tobago (Play as a medium for promoting creativity and imagination in adult learning, higher education, professional development, and classroom practice and applying play research and theory to school, family, and community settings: The value of open-ended and structured materials).

In addition, Patte participated in a panel discussion (The State of Play in America) of prominent play scholars at the Children’s Museum of Manhattan to explore key issues facing parents, educators, and policy makers about children’s access and participation in play. Patte Scholarship

Michael Ruffini

Michael Ruffini Michael Ruffini, Ed.D., professor of educational technology, presented a poster/presentation "Powtoon Uses and Design Tips” at The Pennsylvania Educational Technology Expo and Conference (PETE&C), a statewide event that provides quality programs focused on technology hardware, software and integration strategies in education. The conference was held from Feb. 12 to Feb. 15 at the Hershey Lodge and Convention Center. Ruffini Scholarship

Chigozie Achebe

Chigozie Achebe, Ph.D., director of access and success, assistant professor of academic enrichment, had her book chapter proposal, “Student Leadership and Activism Initiative (SLAI),” recently accepted for inclusion in the upcoming book, "Social Justice and Parent Partnerships in Multicultural Education Contexts: Making Schools Work." This edited text book volume, published by IGI Global (formerly Idea Group Inc.), will expose teachers, administrators, and university faculty to pedagogies, strategies, and practical hands-on methods that may be used to develop stronger parent partnerships using social justice. This book is anticipated to be released in 2017.

Caryn Terwilliger

Caryn Terwilliger, Ph.D., assistant professor of teaching and learning, had her research with Rogowsky, B., Young, C. and Kribbs, E, "Playful learning with technology: The effect of computer-assisted instruction on literacy and numeracy skills of preschoolers" accepted for publication in The International Journal of Play. The journal’s annual acceptance rate for submitted manuscripts is 20 percent.

Also, Terwilliger had her presentation, "Computer-assisted instruction: Increasing young learners’ literacy and mathematical gains" accepted for the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education, Austin, TX. This proposal received the highest reviewer scores and I was also invited to submit it my presentation/research to one of their international journals. Additionally, she was recently awarded the McDowell Institute Faculty Fellowship for 2017. Title of Fellowship for Professional Development: Developing Culturally Responsive Pedagogy: Enhancing Student Instruction and Learning.

Kurt Smith

Kurt Smith

Kurt Smith, Ph.D., professor of philosophy, recently returned from having given the keynote for the Third Annual Southern Utah University Undergraduate Philosophy Conference, at Southern Utah University, Cedar City, Utah. The conference has emerged as a premier showcase of undergraduate talent and research, funded in part by the Grace A. Tanner Center for Human Values.

The Grace A. Tanner Center for Human Values was created through an endowment provided by the Tanner Trust for Utah Universities by Obert C. Tanner, Professor Emeritus of philosophy at the University of Utah and the Founder and former Chairman of the O.C. Tanner Jewelry Company.

Sharlene Gilman

Sharlene Gilman

Sharlene Gilman, Ph.D., assistant professor of writing in the Department of Academic Enrichment, had an article accepted for publication in the Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy. The article, "Sacred Shock: Student Actors on Anti-bullying Improvisation and Impact of Self-rehearsal" is a study of adolescent actors from Selinsgrove High School's Tolerance Troupe. The article focuses on how actors and troupe alumni see using dramatic arts to affect peer audiences and the ways in which taking multiple positions in the theatrical and real dynamic of bully, bystander, and target author their world-view and themselves.

Cassandra Sachar

Cassandra Sachar

Cassandra O’Sullivan Sachar, Ed.D., assistant professor of writing, recently published several articles: “How to Shrink Your Course” in The Chronicle of Higher Education (September 2016), “6 Tips for Supercharging Your Learning Stations” in Edutopia (October 2016), “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: How Teacher Modeling Improves Student Writing” in Teachers.Net Gazette (October- November 2016), “Five Quick Tips to Motivate Reluctant Writers” in the NADE English SPIN Newsletter (November 2016), “Bridging Students’ Cultural Understanding: Teaching World Literature” in Modern English Teacher (January 2017), and “Reflection on My First Year as a Professor: How I Cultivated a Rewarding Experience” in Women in Higher Education (February 2017).

Dina Clark

Dina Clark

Dina Clark, Ph.D., assistant professor of accounting, coauthored paper with Lam Nguyen, associate professor of management, and two other colleagues entitled, "The management skills of Russians: Do work, management, and government experiences matter?" accepted for publication in Public Organization Review.

Public Organization Review (POR), published by Springer, is a refereed journal that is listed/indexed in Scopus, EconLit, Google Scholar, EBSCO, ProQuest, and others. ISSN Print: 1566-7170, ISSN online: 1573-7098. Acceptance rate: 20 percent.

This study examines the impacts of different types of experience on management skills of working adults in Russia. The study is based on a sample of 527 MBA students, line and middle managers covering 32 regions in 13 different industries in Russia. This study proves that work experience, management experience, and government experience are significant factors in their technical, human, and conceptual skills. Human skills scores are significantly higher for all groups than group with no management experience. Score for human skills increased with years of government experience only, but not with working or management years of experience.

Amarilis Hidalgo de Jesus

Amarilis Hidalgo de Jesus

Amarilis Hidalgo de Jesus, Ph.D., professor of language and cultures, has published an article, “Sobre mi cadáver (2012) de Marta Aponte Alsina: Crónica de una familia disfuncional catalana puertorriqueña” (“Marta Aponte Alsina’s Sobre mi cadáver (2012): Memories of a Dysfunctional Puerto Rican/Catalan Family” in Cuadernos de Estudios Humanísticos y Literatura, Universidad de Puerto Rico, Humacao Campus. Vol. 23: 2016, pp. 130-136.

Read the papers “De adentro para afuera: Temas hebreos en la literatura del Caribe insular y el otro Caribe hispano” “(Hebrew Themes in the Spanish Caribbean”) at the Hispanic Association of Feminine Literature and Culture, Houston, Texas, November 2016; “Days of Awe de Achy Obejas: La historia judía cubana” (“Achy Obejas’ Days of Awe: Cuban Jewsih History”) at the Jornadas Andinas de Literatura, La Paz, Bolivia, August 2016; “Concierto para Leah, el barco San Luis y la historia judia cubana” (Mayra Landa’s Concierto para Leah and the Saint Louis Ship, the History of Cuban Jews”) at the ILLI Conference in Jenna, Germany, July 2016.

Hidalgo de Jesus been invited to be an external program reviewer for the Spanish Program at Truman University, MO.

Kai Kuang

Kai Kuang

Kai Kuang, Ph.D., assistant professor of communication studies, recently recent the Gerald R. Miller Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation Award at the annual National Communication Association's Annual Convention. The Dissertation Awards program was created in 1970 to recognize new scholars who have recently completed their dissertation. The first awards were given in 1971. The Miller Award is presented to most outstanding dissertations completed in the field. Up to three awards may be given in any year.

Kuang also received the Top Paper Award from the Health Communication Division at the Convention this year.

Ferda Asya

Ferda Asya

Ferda Asya, Ph.D., professor of English, published a chapter, , titled “Motifs of Anarchism in Edith Wharton’s The Children,” in Edith Wharton and Cosmopolitanism. Ed. Merdith L. Goldsmith and Emily J. Orlando. Gainesville: UP of Florida, 2016. 38-61. Print.

In this chapter, she explored Edith Wharton’s enactment of the removal of her childhood repressions in The Children, a novel of expatriate children banding together in anarchist solidarity against their ineffectual parents, by implementing the unique theory of transatlantic anarchism that allows the coexistence of the two irreconcilable veins of anarchism, the collectivist Darwinian-Kropotkinian and the individualist Nietzschean-Stirneresque, and Ernst Bloch’s definition of utopia based on his notion of Not-Yet-Conscious, derived from Sigmund Freud’s theories of the unconscious and dreams.

Kathy Kollar-Valovage

Kathy Kollar-Valovage

Kathy Kollar-Valovage, MS, MSIT, CCEP, BU’s Testing Center Coordinator, recently returned from the National College Testing Association Annual Conference in Seattle where she presented the inaugural POD educational session “POD-1: Designing Your Perfect Test Center” as part of the new “POD Series” of the annual conference. This is the first time POD sessions were introduced in the national conference. Kollar-Valovage served a two-year term on the National Conference Program Committee and continues to serve as Pennsylvania’s State Representative to the National College Testing Association (NCTA).

Faith Warner

Faith Warner

Faith Warner, Ph.D., professor of Anthropology, has been selected to serve a three year term on the U.S. Student Fulbright National Screening Committee for study in Mexico through the Institute of International Education (IIE), by invitation of the Institute’s Board of Trustees and CEO, Allan Goodman.

Warner is a 1995 Fulbright awardee, having previously received a Fulbright Garcia-Robles award to conduct ethnographic research with Guatemalan Maya peoples in refugee camps in Mexico and she is a long-standing member of the Fulbright Organization. She also serves the IIE as an advisor for the Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship Program and she is Representative of the East of the national executive council of Lambda Alpha National Collegiate Honor Society in Anthropology.

Mindi Miller

Mindi Miller

Mindi Miller, Ph.D., RN, associate professor of nursing, presented at the 6th Biennial Threshold Concepts Conference sponsored by the International Society on Scholarship, Teaching, and Learning (ISSOTL) in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada this summer. Her podium presentation entitled “Shared Thresholds: A Cutting-edge Dual-course for Any Upper Class Major or Graduate Student” described capstone projects, as well as Quality Matters® standards for distance education.

This presentation contrasted General Education (GE) content, particularly information literacy (IL), to the theory of threshold concepts by using a crosswalk of GE and IL standards. As educators know, student learning outcomes (SLOs) are measurable end points, but threshold concepts involve more than SLOs to include the progression of learning. Threshold concepts were compared with student advancement from a commonsense perspective to project development that applied content and learner proficiencies to meet published standards.

Deb Sanders

Debra Sanders

Deb Sanders, Ph.D., RN, GCNS-BC, FNGNA, assistant professor of nursing and Susan Beck, MSN, RN, assistant professor of nursing, presented at the national ATI Nursing Education Summit, Nashville, TN. Their poster presentation, “ Therapeutic Communication Vignettes: Innovative Teaching Strategy to Engage Senior Level Nursing Students”, demonstrated teaching innovation in the Adult Health 2 senior level nursing course, in which simulated case scenarios and group process is used to enhance the students communication and interaction techniques.

The ATI (Assessment Technology Institute) Summit is attended by nurse educators across the United States to expand and excel in nursing education through the use of integrated nursing education learning systems.

Anne-Dyer Stuart

Anne-Dyer Stuart

Anne-Dyer Stuart, MFA, Ph.D., assistant professor of English, recently had a poem entitled “Inheritance” published in AGNI, a literary journal from Boston University. AGNI has nominated “Inheritance” for the national anthology, Best New Poets 2016.

Stuart also published the poems, “Quick Magic” and “Practice” in the literary journals Pembroke Magazine and Exit 7.

Kristie Byrum

Kristie Byrum

Kristie Byrum, Ph.D, APR, an assistant professor of public relations, recently returned from the World Public Relations Forum in Toronto, where she presented an academic paper as part of the "Research Stream" of the conference.

In this study, Byrum, asserts the European Data Protection Act and recent “Right to be Forgotten” movements conflict with the U.S. Constitution’s First Amendment and public relations ethics codes. Recent actions by Google to honor requests to remove data upon request collide with First Amendment concepts, including the marketplace of ideas theory. Public relations tenets to promote the free flow of information and advocate disclosure, rooted in the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) code of ethics, undergo threats from the European Data Protection Act, further imperiling robust information exchange in society.

Todd Hastings

Todd Hastings, Ph.D., RN, assistant professor of nursing, presented recently completed dissertation research at the 29th annual conference of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association and at the 18th annual conference of the International Society of Psychiatric Nurses.

This oral presentation entitled “Applying Research Evidence in the Transformation of Psychiatric Undergraduate Nursing Education: A Quantitative Quasi-Experimental Study Addressing Nursing Student Attitudes Toward Mental Illness” described a large quantitative research study surveying nursing student perceptions of mental illness at eight professional nursing programs. This study focused on the importance of clarifying and modifying student attitudes about people with mental illness.

Jerry Wemple

Jerry Wemple

Jerry Wemple, MFA, professor of English, had two recent publications. Wemple’s poem “Bridge” appears in the current issue of “cahoodaloodaling,” a quarterly literary journal.

His essay “Funny,” about growing up in rural Pennsylvania, was recently published in “Full Grown People.” Wemple is the author of three poetry collections. His poems and essays have appeared in numerous journals and anthologies.

Lori Metzger

Lori Metzger

Lori M. Metzger, Ph.D., NP-C, assistant professor of nursing, presented at the Education and Simulation conference sponsored by Drexel University in Clearwater Florida on “Assimilating Nursing Students into the Community: Simulation in Public Health." This oral presentation demonstrated the recent teaching innovation implemented in Nursing 410 Public Health Nursing. Through four specific scenarios in correctional health, home health, occupational health and school health, students participate in this simulation to enhance their learning in health settings in a community-based and community-oriented nursing practice.

Metzger presented this with the Director of the Simulated Learning Lab for the Nursing Department Mary-Lee Helbing, MSN. Through this endeavor of teaching innovation, Metzger and Helbing have been awarded a TALE grant for introducing the technology of telehealth into these simulated scenarios.

George Agbango

George Agbango

George Agbango, Ph.D., acting vice provost and dean of undergraduate studies, served as the keynote speaker of the third bi-annual Faculty of Education International Conference at Nnamdi Azikiwe University in Awka, Nigeria. Agbango spoke on the conference's theme, "Emerging Issues in Higher Education in the 21st Century."

The international conference was sponsored by the Global Awareness Society International Unizik Chapter of Awka, Nigeria. GASI promotes research and education in matters related to globalization through annual professional and academic conferences, publication of conference proceedings, publication of the refereed Journal of Global Awareness, provide scholarship support for conference participation, and participation in service and charitable projects around the globe.

Noreen Chikotas

Noreen Chikotas

Noreen Chikotas, D.Ed., CRNP, nursing department graduate coordinator, presented at the Education and Simulation conference sponsored by Drexel University in Clearwater, Fla., on “Transforming the Educational Landscape: Simulation, Innovation and Technology.” The title of her paper was “A Collaborative Effort Between Nursing and Health Communication Studies in Implementing a Standardized Patient Experience for the Advanced Practice Nurse.”

This podium presentation assisted in the dissemination of research, unique in it was developed, implemented and evaluated a collaborative effort between nursing and social science of health communication. The purpose of the phenomenological qualitative study was to examine the impact of standardized patient experiences (SPE) in the education of the Advanced Practice Nurse (APN), thus add to the mounting evidence of SPE’s possibilities.

Brian C. Johnson

Brian C. Johnson Brian C. Johnson, academic advisor, director of Frederick Douglass Institute, recently had his sixth book, The Problematic Tyler Perry, which explores the vast chasm between Perry’s fans’ adoration and the critical reception of his work. While some argue that Perry’s brand of “blackness” is little more than buffoonery, others claim he offers representations that are missing in entertainment choices, especially among niche audiences.

Perry is applauded by some for offering films and television shows that are «good entertainment», while others label his work trashy. He can be seen either as an oracle whose morality plays provide a gospel message of family healing, or as an actor with a misaligned worldview. This book asks: what are we to do with the “problem” of Tyler Perry?

In addition, Johnson’s newest article was published by Film International (Issue 13, No. 4) on“Fear and Self Loving: Masturbation in Movie Teen Comedies.”

Robin Drogan

Robin Drogan

Inclusive practices are at the cornerstone of what we share with students as they prepare to work with diverse groups of children in schools. Robin Drogan, Ph.D., assistant professor of exceptionality programs, and Darlene Perner, Ed.D., professor of exceptionality programs, have published a chapter, “Facilitating Systems of Support” in Including Learners with Low-Incidence Disabilities.

This book, as part of a series, brings a unique international perspective on a topic that is not often written, supports for students with low-incidence disabilities. Some of the inclusive education features include: values and beliefs, rights, relationships, a sense of belonging, effective practices, and school community and culture. The focus is on quality implementation of effective collaborative practices.

Michael Borland

Michael Borland

Michael G. Borland, Ph.D., assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry, was recently designated an Education Fellow of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Borland is one of only two PASSHE faculty members, and one of 75 BMB professionals nationwide who have earned this distinction.

Earlier this year, the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry became the first PASSHE university to receive an ASBMB accreditation. BU’s biochemistry program was rated on factors including research laboratory facilities, faculty scholarship and educational goals. The accreditation recognizes BU’s biochemistry program as meeting the organization’s advanced requirements.

Shaheen Awan

Shaheen Awan

Shaheen Awan, Ph.D., professor of speech-language pathology, recently had his article, Exploring the Relationship Between Spectral and Cepstral Measures of Voice and the Voice Handicap Index (VHI), voted the Best Speech Language Pathology Paper of 2014. Journal of Voice received a record number of manuscript submissions in 2014. This year’s Best Paper Award Winners will be announced and awarded in May during the 44th Annual Symposium: Care of the Professional Voice Joint Meeting with the International Association of Phonosurgery.

Lam D. Nguyen

Lam D. Nguyen

Lam D. Nguyen, D.Mgt., associate professor of management, recently had his two coauthored papers published in the International Journal of Business Research, Vol. 15, No. 1. The first paper, “Core Competencies: Redefining Competition in the Global Economy,” reviewed concepts of core competencies and how to turn core competencies into competitive advantages in order to compete effectively in the globalized market. The second paper, “Online Group Buying: An Investigation on Service Quality and Customer Satisfaction in Vietnam,” discussed a causal model to identify determinants to the level of satisfaction with online group buying sites in Vietnam.

The International Journal of Business Research (IJBR) is a peer-reviewed public journal in the Ulrich’s International Periodicals Directory and in Cabell’s Directories 2004-14 Editions with a 20 percent acceptance rate.