Faculty Scholarship and Research

Faculty Scholarship and Research


Jesús Salas-Elorza

Jesús Salas-Elorza

Jesús Salas-Elorza, professor of Spanish of the Department of Languages and Cultures. Translation of the collection of poems title Mall by the Venezuelan poet Julieta León in collaboration with River Poets of the town of Bloomsburg was published in its second translated edition, April 2017, by Adoro Leer at Create Space. Born in 1949 in Caracas, Venezuela. Graduate in Philosophy and in Letters, by the Central University of Venezuela. León studied music and piano, for many years, in the academy Juan Manuel Olivares; made sculpture and worked ceramics in the Fire Arts Workshop. Specialist in Group Dynamics, graduated from the postgraduate Humanities of the School of Psychology of the Central University of Venezuela.

Ferda Asya

Ferda Asya

Ferda Asya, Ph.D., professor of English, presented a paper, titled “From Wharton to White: Paris in Focus and Flux in Expatriate Writing,” at the American Literature Association (ALA) Annual Conference in Boston, Massachusetts, on 28 May 2017. The American Literature Association is committed to exploring the richness and diversity of American writing and welcomes all forms of scholarship. It is not limited to any specific critical methodology or dogma.

The primary purpose of the American Literature Association is the advancement of humanistic learning by encouraging the study of American authors and their works. The American Literature Association shall actively encourage fellowship and scholarly interaction among persons interested in American authors, their art, their ideas, and their times.

Joseph L. Andreacci

Joseph L. Andreacci

Joseph L. Andreacci, professor of Exercise Science, and Luke Haile, assistant professor of Exercise Science, along with former student Cody Croall, MS ’17, are authors on the manuscript entitled, “The Relationship between Maximal Oxygen Consumption and Bone Health in College-Aged Men.” Which appears in the October 2017 issue of Journal of Exercise Physiology Online.

The Journal of Exercise Physiology online, published by the American Society of Exercise Physiologists, is a professional peer reviewed Internet-based journal devoted to original research in exercise physiology. JEPonline is the first electronic peer reviewed exercise physiology journal in the history of the profession. It is founded for the purpose of disseminating exercise physiology research and, thus to serve specifically the professional needs of the exercise physiologist. The Editors welcome both empirical and theoretical articles.

Jennifer Haney

Jennifer Haney

Jennifer Haney, Ph.D., assistant professor in EGGS, passed the Certified Emergency Manager (CEM) Exam in August in partial fulfillment of the requirements for this sought-after designation. Haney will have one year to complete the remaining application requirements.

The CEM title is a nationally and internationally recognized professional certification for emergency managers. This esteemed recognition of excellence is earned by those who demonstrate a strong understanding of and commitment to the emergency management field through a combination of knowledge, experience, work history, training, education, and contributions to the profession.

Michael Patte

Michael Patte

Michael Patte, Ph.D., professor of teaching and learning and a child life specialist, received a two-year appointment as an adjunct Professor of Humanities and Education and Research Scientist at the University of the West Indies Family Development Center in Trinidad and Tobago. In this role Patte will engage in collaborative international research projects, encourage the exchange of students and faculty, and serve on thesis and dissertation committees.

The Family Development Center is a dynamic and unique dual-purpose organization. Comprising of the Children’s Centre and the Family Development Centre (UWI-FDC), the Centre has been a model for developmentally appropriate early childhood care and education (ECCE) both locally and regionally. It provides training for future early childhood professionals and frequently conducts workshops for parents and the wider ECCE community.The closely aligned UWI-FDC generates research with an aim of improving the life outcomes for children of Trinidad and Tobago and the Caribbean.

Debbie Stayer

Debbie Stayer

Debbie Stayer, Ph.D., RN-BC, CCRN-K, assistant professor of nursing, and Joan S. Lockhart Ph.D., RN, CORLN, AOCN, CNE, ANEF, FAAN, Professor Duquesne University, authors of Living with Dying in the Pediatric ICU:A Nursing Perspective published in the American Journal of Critcal Care (July 2016) were awarded the 2017 APEX Grand Award for Writing, top-level recognition reserved for the most outstanding entries. APEX Awards for Publication Excellence, is an annual competition for publishers, editors, writers and designers who create print, Web, electronic and social media materials. This year, only 100 of more than 1,400 entries received APEX Grand Awards.

Their research provides insight into the complex issues of caring for dying children and the children’s families from the perspective of nurses in pediatric intensive care units. APEX judges noted that the article offers “a thoughtful, thorough and well-written discussion of the challenges faced by pediatric nurses who care for children with life-threatening illnesses” and called it “an impressive analysis with a lot of useful advice for practitioners.”

Conrad Quintyn

Conrad Quintyn

Conrad Quintyn, Ph.D., associate professor of anthropology has published two articles. The first is a coauthored article titled: An assessment of postcranial indices, ratios, and body mass versus eco-geographical variables of prehistoric Jomon, Yayoi agriculturalists, and Kumejima Islanders of Japan. American Journal Human Biology 2017;00:e23015. This research, partially supported by the College of Liberal Arts Research and Disciplinary Grants, has implications for understanding patterns of long bone variation in prehistoric East Asians and Native North and South Americans. The second article is titled: Religion and Science: The reality of compatibility and illusion of conflict. Sociology and Anthropology 2016, 4(4): 249-256.

Christina Francis

Christina Francis

Christina Francis, Ph.D., associate professor of English, presented a paper entitled, “If You Weren’t Such a Clotpole … : A Look at Merthur (BBC's Merlin) Fanfiction” at the International Arthurian Congress, July 23-29, in Wurzburg, Germany. The International Arthurian Congress occurs every three years in a different location, bringing together scholars from all corners of the globe who study and teach Arthurian literature. Her paper examined the value of Arthurian fan fiction as Arthurian texts in their own right and the role of fan fiction in Arthurian medievalism.

Julie Vandivere

Julie Vandivere

Julie Vandivere, Ph.D., professor of English and director of honors, presented a paper in June at the 27th Annual International Conference on Virginia Woolf at the University of Reading, England. The paper was titled “Defining Life in Essays and Reports: Mr. Bennett and Mrs. Brown and The 1916 Government Report on Infant Human Mortality.” She also wrote an essay, “Invisible Galleries: How Financial Speculation Created a Female Modernist Tradition,” that will appear in a volume from University of Florida Press. The University of Florida collection is called Modernist Women Writers and the Making of Community and she co-wrote the introduction and co-edited this collection. She also had an essay titled “International Conferences as a tool for Undergraduate Research” accepted for the PMLA collection, Teaching Women Modernists.

Matthew Ricker

Matthew Ricker, Ph.D., assistant professor of environmental, geographical and geological sciences, has been awarded a $25,300 grant from the National Geographic Society for his project “Living with water: Classic Maya pond management at El Peru-Waka’, Peten, Guatemala.” Damien Marken, instructor of anthropology, is a co-investigator. The National Geographic Society is one of the largest non-profit scientific and educational institutions in the world. Founded in 1888, its interests include geography, archaeology and natural science, the promotion of environmental and historical conservation, and the study of world culture and history.

Amarilis Hidalgo de Jesus

Amarilis Hidalgo de Jesus

Amarilis Hidalgo de Jesus, Ph.D., professor of language and cultures, published the Review Essay "Escritoras bolivianas a traves de su historia literaria" (Bolivian Women Writers' literary history)" in Letras Femeninas, 42.2, pp. 145-151. Lf (Letras femeninas), the journal of the International Association of Women’s Studies in Hispanic Literature and Culture (AILCFH), was one of the earliest academic journals to be devoted strictly to gender related issues, women authors and feminist theory in the context of Hispanic literatures and cultures (with some articles on Luso-Brazilian and US-Latino authors and filmmakers).

The biannual, peer-reviewed journal was first published in Spring 1975 at the University of Colorado, Denver by a progressive group of largely Latin and North American women scholars and writers working in US universities and colleges, and has been published without interruption since then. In additional to critical articles on gender or gender-related topics, Lf features unpublished work by Spanish, Latin American and Latina women authors, poets and playwrights, interviews with writers and critics, and a substantial book review section in every issue.

David Magolis

David Magolis

David Magolis, Ph.D., associate professor of mass communications, was recently selected as the Outstanding Volunteer for the National Association of Media Literacy Education. This award is given every two years.

The Outstanding Volunteer Award, "is specifically in recognition of a non-Board member volunteering a substantial amount of time in service of a specific NAMLE project or initiative. This award is given to a volunteer who has devoted many hours to their volunteer task(s) over a period of three or more months." Magolis presented and moderated two sessions at the conference on June 26-28 in Chicago.

Mindy Suzanne Andino

Mindy Suzanne Andino

Mindy Suzanne Andino, Ed.D., assistant professor of teaching and learning, presented at the ACPA-College Student Educators International Annual Conference in Columbus, Ohio, with three graduate students in the College Student Affairs graduate program. Research presentations included, “Preparing for the Alpha Generation Entering College: Foreshadowing and Dialectic,” with Mary (Kate) Orzolek ’17 and “Drunkorexia and Disordered Eating in College Students” with Katie Marie Slater ‘17 and Olivia Naugle ’15.

Andino’s first presentation covered how student affairs practitioners have a responsibility to begin discussing how higher education will transform as students begin to enroll who have never known a world without social media. In this session, presenters explored the enrollment of Generation Alpha in an effort to implement a strengths-based education initiative. Presenters discussed the potential academic performance and social engagement of this generation.

The second presentation explored the phenomenon of Drunkorexia, typically categorized by cutting out food to save calories for alcoholic calories, excessive exercising or purposefully drinking to excess. This research explored the lived experiences of students to gain a nuanced understanding of the implication of Drunkorexic behaviors through interviews conducted by a team of graduate research students under the guidance of Andino. This research was funded by a Faculty Research Grant.

Andrew Blair Staley

Blair Staley

Andrew Blair Staley, CPA, professor of accounting, and his colleague, Donald T. Williamson, the Eminent Professor of Taxation and the Howard S. Dvorkin Faculty Fellow at American University, had an article published, Williamson, D. T. & Staley, A. B. (2017). Ransomware: Tax Compliance Issues for a New Reality. Tax Management Memorandum, 58 (12), 281-287. Tax Management Memorandum provides a authoritative outlook on new issues, developments, trends and strategies. Tax Management Memorandum has a total distribution of 4,437.

Swapan Mookerjee

Swapan Mookerjee

Swapan Mookerjee, Ph.D., professor of exercise science, is a co-author of a research paper published in Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology (June 2017). This work is based on his collaborative work with colleagues at the Institute of Physiology & Anatomy, as well the Institute of Movement & Neuroscience, German Sport University, Cologne, Germany. According to Mookerjee, these investigations will enhance our understanding of the physiological modeling of cardiorespiratory responses following high intensity resistance exercise.

Denise Davidson

Denise L. Davidson

Denise L. Davidson, Ph.D., assistant professor of teaching and learning, has been awarded the 2017 ACUHO-I Research and Publication Award. Davidson, who teaches in the College Student Affairs graduate program, will be presented the award in June during the Association of College and University Housing Officers - International’s annual conference in Providence, R.I.

ACUHO-I is the Association of College and University Housing Officers-International. ACUHO-I members believe in developing exceptional residential experiences at colleges, universities, and other post-secondary institutions around the world.

Michael Shepard

Michael Shepard, Ph.D., professor and chair, environmental, geographical, and geological sciences, had his second book, "Introduction to Planetary Photometry," published this spring by Cambridge University Press.

Introducing planetary photometry as a quantitative remote sensing tool, this handbook demonstrates how reflected light can be measured and used to investigate the physical properties of bodies in our Solar System. Shepard explains how data gathered from telescopes and spacecraft are processed and used to infer properties such as the size, shape, albedo, and composition of celestial objects including planets, moons, asteroids, and comets.

Beginning with an overview of the history and background theory of photometry, later chapters delve into the physical principles behind commonly used photometric models and the mechanics of observation, data reduction, and analysis. Real-world examples, problems, and case studies are included, all at an introductory level suitable for new graduate students, planetary scientists, amateur astronomers and researchers looking for an overview of this field.

Michael C. Hickey

Michael Hickey

Michael C. Hickey, Ph.D., professor of history, presented the research paper "Dogs in the Manger? Rural Smolensk in 1917" at the 55th Annual Meeting of the Southern Conference on Slavic Studies in Alexandria, Va., this spring.

Hickey's paper examined the intersection of village-level conflicts over control of forest resources and political debates over the locations of decision-making power and the structure of the revolutionary state in rural Russia in 1917, based upon local archival and newspaper sources. Hickey Scholarship

Rebecca Toothaker

Rebecca Toothaker

Rebecca Toothaker, Ph.D., R.N., assistant professor of nursing, was able to present her research “The Impact of Clickers on Nursing Education: Millennial’s Perspective ” at the Elsevier Nursing Conference, Las Vegas, Nevada in March 2017. This poster presentation disseminated research findings from her grant to explore the millennial’s perception of clicker technology as an active strategy in a nursing classroom.

In addition, she published a manuscript stemming from her dissertation in the Journal of Professional Nursing entitled “A Phenomenological Study of Millennial Students and Traditional Pedagogies.” She was also able to present at the Pennsylvania Association of School Nurses and Practitioners (PASNAP) annual education conference in March 2017. The title of the conference was: “Light the Way: Brighten a Student’s Tomorrow” The title of her accepted paper was “Clinical skills in the School Setting: You want me to do what?” The three hour podium presentation aimed to enhance the school nurses’ understanding of skills, adapt current techniques for nursing procedures, and provided a working knowledge of evidenced based practices for the school nurse.

Melissa Cheese

Melissa Cheese, Ed.D., assistant professor of reading, at the 41st Annual National Association for Developmental Education's Conference was appointed as co-chair of the NADE Reading Special Interest Network. The Reading SPIN is a community of learners, researchers, and practitioners who share ideas about teaching developmental reading at the college level as well as research and practice related to content area reading for the purpose of promoting reading comprehension in all disciplines.

In addition, Cheese recently published the article: “Integrating Writing into a Developmental Reading Course to Motivate Reluctant Readers" in the NADE Reading SPIN Newsletter (February 2017).

Michael Ruffini

Michael Ruffini Michael Ruffini, Ed.D., professor of educational technology, presented a poster/presentation "Powtoon Uses and Design Tips” at The Pennsylvania Educational Technology Expo and Conference (PETE&C), a statewide event that provides quality programs focused on technology hardware, software and integration strategies in education. The conference was held from Feb. 12 to Feb. 15 at the Hershey Lodge and Convention Center. Ruffini Scholarship

Chigozie Achebe

Chigozie Achebe, Ph.D., director of access and success, assistant professor of academic enrichment, had her book chapter proposal, “Student Leadership and Activism Initiative (SLAI),” recently accepted for inclusion in the upcoming book, "Social Justice and Parent Partnerships in Multicultural Education Contexts: Making Schools Work." This edited text book volume, published by IGI Global (formerly Idea Group Inc.), will expose teachers, administrators, and university faculty to pedagogies, strategies, and practical hands-on methods that may be used to develop stronger parent partnerships using social justice. This book is anticipated to be released in 2017.

Caryn Terwilliger

Caryn Terwilliger, Ph.D., assistant professor of teaching and learning, had her research with Rogowsky, B., Young, C. and Kribbs, E, "Playful learning with technology: The effect of computer-assisted instruction on literacy and numeracy skills of preschoolers" accepted for publication in The International Journal of Play. The journal’s annual acceptance rate for submitted manuscripts is 20 percent.

Also, Terwilliger had her presentation, "Computer-assisted instruction: Increasing young learners’ literacy and mathematical gains" accepted for the Society for Information Technology and Teacher Education, Austin, TX. This proposal received the highest reviewer scores and I was also invited to submit it my presentation/research to one of their international journals. Additionally, she was recently awarded the McDowell Institute Faculty Fellowship for 2017. Title of Fellowship for Professional Development: Developing Culturally Responsive Pedagogy: Enhancing Student Instruction and Learning.

Kurt Smith

Kurt Smith

Kurt Smith, Ph.D., professor of philosophy, recently returned from having given the keynote for the Third Annual Southern Utah University Undergraduate Philosophy Conference, at Southern Utah University, Cedar City, Utah. The conference has emerged as a premier showcase of undergraduate talent and research, funded in part by the Grace A. Tanner Center for Human Values.

The Grace A. Tanner Center for Human Values was created through an endowment provided by the Tanner Trust for Utah Universities by Obert C. Tanner, Professor Emeritus of philosophy at the University of Utah and the Founder and former Chairman of the O.C. Tanner Jewelry Company.

Sharlene Gilman

Sharlene Gilman

Sharlene Gilman, Ph.D., assistant professor of writing in the Department of Academic Enrichment, had an article accepted for publication in the Journal of Curriculum and Pedagogy. The article, "Sacred Shock: Student Actors on Anti-bullying Improvisation and Impact of Self-rehearsal" is a study of adolescent actors from Selinsgrove High School's Tolerance Troupe. The article focuses on how actors and troupe alumni see using dramatic arts to affect peer audiences and the ways in which taking multiple positions in the theatrical and real dynamic of bully, bystander, and target author their world-view and themselves.

Cassandra Sachar

Cassandra Sachar

Cassandra O’Sullivan Sachar, Ed.D., assistant professor of writing, recently published several articles: “How to Shrink Your Course” in The Chronicle of Higher Education (September 2016), “6 Tips for Supercharging Your Learning Stations” in Edutopia (October 2016), “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly: How Teacher Modeling Improves Student Writing” in Teachers.Net Gazette (October- November 2016), “Five Quick Tips to Motivate Reluctant Writers” in the NADE English SPIN Newsletter (November 2016), “Bridging Students’ Cultural Understanding: Teaching World Literature” in Modern English Teacher (January 2017), and “Reflection on My First Year as a Professor: How I Cultivated a Rewarding Experience” in Women in Higher Education (February 2017).

Dina Clark

Dina Clark

Dina Clark, Ph.D., assistant professor of accounting, coauthored paper with Lam Nguyen, associate professor of management, and two other colleagues entitled, "The management skills of Russians: Do work, management, and government experiences matter?" accepted for publication in Public Organization Review.

Public Organization Review (POR), published by Springer, is a refereed journal that is listed/indexed in Scopus, EconLit, Google Scholar, EBSCO, ProQuest, and others. ISSN Print: 1566-7170, ISSN online: 1573-7098. Acceptance rate: 20 percent.

This study examines the impacts of different types of experience on management skills of working adults in Russia. The study is based on a sample of 527 MBA students, line and middle managers covering 32 regions in 13 different industries in Russia. This study proves that work experience, management experience, and government experience are significant factors in their technical, human, and conceptual skills. Human skills scores are significantly higher for all groups than group with no management experience. Score for human skills increased with years of government experience only, but not with working or management years of experience.

Kai Kuang

Kai Kuang

Kai Kuang, Ph.D., assistant professor of communication studies, recently recent the Gerald R. Miller Outstanding Doctoral Dissertation Award at the annual National Communication Association's Annual Convention. The Dissertation Awards program was created in 1970 to recognize new scholars who have recently completed their dissertation. The first awards were given in 1971. The Miller Award is presented to most outstanding dissertations completed in the field. Up to three awards may be given in any year.

Kuang also received the Top Paper Award from the Health Communication Division at the Convention this year.

Faith Warner

Faith Warner

Faith Warner, Ph.D., professor of Anthropology, has been selected to serve a three year term on the U.S. Student Fulbright National Screening Committee for study in Mexico through the Institute of International Education (IIE), by invitation of the Institute’s Board of Trustees and CEO, Allan Goodman.

Warner is a 1995 Fulbright awardee, having previously received a Fulbright Garcia-Robles award to conduct ethnographic research with Guatemalan Maya peoples in refugee camps in Mexico and she is a long-standing member of the Fulbright Organization. She also serves the IIE as an advisor for the Benjamin A. Gilman International Scholarship Program and she is Representative of the East of the national executive council of Lambda Alpha National Collegiate Honor Society in Anthropology.

Mindi Miller

Mindi Miller

Mindi Miller, Ph.D., RN, associate professor of nursing, presented at the 6th Biennial Threshold Concepts Conference sponsored by the International Society on Scholarship, Teaching, and Learning (ISSOTL) in Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada this summer. Her podium presentation entitled “Shared Thresholds: A Cutting-edge Dual-course for Any Upper Class Major or Graduate Student” described capstone projects, as well as Quality Matters® standards for distance education.

This presentation contrasted General Education (GE) content, particularly information literacy (IL), to the theory of threshold concepts by using a crosswalk of GE and IL standards. As educators know, student learning outcomes (SLOs) are measurable end points, but threshold concepts involve more than SLOs to include the progression of learning. Threshold concepts were compared with student advancement from a commonsense perspective to project development that applied content and learner proficiencies to meet published standards.

Deb Sanders

Debra Sanders

Deb Sanders, Ph.D., RN, GCNS-BC, FNGNA, assistant professor of nursing and Susan Beck, MSN, RN, assistant professor of nursing, presented at the national ATI Nursing Education Summit, Nashville, TN. Their poster presentation, “ Therapeutic Communication Vignettes: Innovative Teaching Strategy to Engage Senior Level Nursing Students”, demonstrated teaching innovation in the Adult Health 2 senior level nursing course, in which simulated case scenarios and group process is used to enhance the students communication and interaction techniques.

The ATI (Assessment Technology Institute) Summit is attended by nurse educators across the United States to expand and excel in nursing education through the use of integrated nursing education learning systems.

Anne-Dyer Stuart

Anne-Dyer Stuart

Anne-Dyer Stuart, MFA, Ph.D., assistant professor of English, recently had a poem entitled “Inheritance” published in AGNI, a literary journal from Boston University. AGNI has nominated “Inheritance” for the national anthology, Best New Poets 2016.

Stuart also published the poems, “Quick Magic” and “Practice” in the literary journals Pembroke Magazine and Exit 7.

Kristie Byrum

Kristie Byrum

Kristie Byrum, Ph.D, APR, an assistant professor of public relations, recently returned from the World Public Relations Forum in Toronto, where she presented an academic paper as part of the "Research Stream" of the conference.

In this study, Byrum, asserts the European Data Protection Act and recent “Right to be Forgotten” movements conflict with the U.S. Constitution’s First Amendment and public relations ethics codes. Recent actions by Google to honor requests to remove data upon request collide with First Amendment concepts, including the marketplace of ideas theory. Public relations tenets to promote the free flow of information and advocate disclosure, rooted in the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) code of ethics, undergo threats from the European Data Protection Act, further imperiling robust information exchange in society.

Jerry Wemple

Jerry Wemple

Jerry Wemple, MFA, professor of English, had two recent publications. Wemple’s poem “Bridge” appears in the current issue of “cahoodaloodaling,” a quarterly literary journal.

His essay “Funny,” about growing up in rural Pennsylvania, was recently published in “Full Grown People.” Wemple is the author of three poetry collections. His poems and essays have appeared in numerous journals and anthologies.

Lori Metzger

Lori Metzger

Lori M. Metzger, Ph.D., NP-C, assistant professor of nursing, presented at the Education and Simulation conference sponsored by Drexel University in Clearwater Florida on “Assimilating Nursing Students into the Community: Simulation in Public Health." This oral presentation demonstrated the recent teaching innovation implemented in Nursing 410 Public Health Nursing. Through four specific scenarios in correctional health, home health, occupational health and school health, students participate in this simulation to enhance their learning in health settings in a community-based and community-oriented nursing practice.

Metzger presented this with the Director of the Simulated Learning Lab for the Nursing Department Mary-Lee Helbing, MSN. Through this endeavor of teaching innovation, Metzger and Helbing have been awarded a TALE grant for introducing the technology of telehealth into these simulated scenarios.

George Agbango

George Agbango

George Agbango, Ph.D., acting vice provost and dean of undergraduate studies, served as the keynote speaker of the third bi-annual Faculty of Education International Conference at Nnamdi Azikiwe University in Awka, Nigeria. Agbango spoke on the conference's theme, "Emerging Issues in Higher Education in the 21st Century."

The international conference was sponsored by the Global Awareness Society International Unizik Chapter of Awka, Nigeria. GASI promotes research and education in matters related to globalization through annual professional and academic conferences, publication of conference proceedings, publication of the refereed Journal of Global Awareness, provide scholarship support for conference participation, and participation in service and charitable projects around the globe.